Sunday, April 14, 2013

Spicy Sichuan Noodles for #SundaySupper



Have you ever seen the movie Eat Drink Man Woman?  If you love foodie movies, this is one of the best.  Shot in Taiwan and directed by Academy Award winning director, Ang Lee, Eat Drink Man Woman (1994) is the story of an aging chef who tries desperately to keep his family together by cooking elaborate feasts for his three daughters every Sunday.  In the opening scene, he prepares dish after dish and you can’t help but think that he must have a crowd coming.  With every plate that was finished, I wanted to be at that table!  I counted at least 14 dishes and then the chef mentioned, as he rushed off to deal with an emergency at his restaurant, “The crab dumplings are still in the steamer!”   Crab dumplings?  Yes, please!  (I read somewhere that the opening cooking scene actually took two weeks to film.  I believe it!)

A screenshot from the movie of the LADEN #SundaySupper table, just as the chef rushes off to his restaurant. 

This week’s #SundaySupper theme, hosted by the delightful Heather of GirliChef, is movie-inspired recipes.  What could be better inspiration than Eat Drink Man Woman, where Sunday supper is the most special, unifying meal of the week?  We love Chinese food of all kinds so it was hard for me to choose just one dish, but, finally, I decided that the Spicy Sichuan Noodles from Ken Hom's Chinese Cookery would be perfect.  Noodles in Chinese culture symbolize long life (so you never cut noodles!) and anything spicy is a winner in our house.   Don’t let the long list of ingredients scare you.  This comes together quickly and is sooooo tasty.   Like many noodle dishes, it gets better and better and leftovers will be your favorite lunch ever, the next day.  If you have any left over. 

Ingredients
13 1/4 oz or 375g ground or minced pork
1 1/2 tablespoons dark soy sauce (sometimes called Special Soy in the grocery stores) 
1 tablespoon Shaoxing rice wine or dry sherry
Cantonese-style egg noodles
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 lb + or 500g dried Cantonese egg noodles
1 tablespoon sesame oil
3-4 tablespoons peanut oil
2 tablespoons garlic
2 tablespoons fresh ginger
5 tablespoons green onions
2 tablespoons sesame paste (tahini) or smooth peanut butter (I used peanut butter.)
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
2 teaspoons light soy sauce
2 teaspoons chili bean sauce
2 tablespoon chili oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 cup or 250ml chicken stock

For the garnish:
2 teaspoons Sichuan peppercorns

Method
Mix the pork with the next four ingredients: the dark soy sauce, the rice wine or dry sherry, the salt and black pepper.  Stir well, cover the bowl with cling film and set aside.  (This can be done earlier in the day, in which case, refrigerate until needed.) 


Put some water on to boil in a pot big enough for your egg noodles.  Add a little salt to the water. 

Peel and finely mince your garlic and ginger.  Finely chop your green onions.  Set aside. 



When the water comes to a boil, drop in the noodles and cook about 3-5 minutes, until they are done. 



Drain the noodles in a colander and rinse with hot water.  Drain again.  


Put the noodles in a bowl and pour over the tablespoon sesame oil.  Toss to coat and cover.  This can also be done early in the day and refrigerated until needed.)


Mix the sesame paste or smooth peanut butter, dark soy sauce, light soy sauce, chili bean sauce, chili oil, salt and freshly ground black pepper in a small bowl, and set aside until you are ready to cook the dish. 


Meanwhile, toast your Sichuan peppercorns in a small skillet for a few minutes, and then grind them up with a mortar and pestle. 



Okay, are you ready to cook and eat?  

Heat your wok or large skillet until screaming hot and then add the peanut oil.  

Yeah, I didn't measure too carefully.  Sorry. 

When it is really hot too, stirfry the garlic, ginger and green onions for a couple of minutes. 


Add in the seasoned pork and break it up with a wooden spoon as it cooks.  Cook until all the pink is gone.  




Now add in the bowl of seasonings you mixed together (with the peanut butter) along with the chicken stock.   



Let it bubble along for a few minutes, and then add in the noodles. 


Stir well so the noodles are well-coated with the liquid seasonings and cook until they are hot through again.  I find it most effective to use two spoons and toss the noodles as you would a salad. 


Pour the noodles into a serving dish and sprinkle with the ground Sichuan peppercorns (and a few random chopped green onions for color, if desired) and serve immediately.  



Enjoy!  



Sunday Supper Movement

Have a look at all the wonderful movie-inspired recipes the #SundaySupper group have for you today!  Is your favorite foodie movie among them? 


NOW SHOWING: 

Toast (bready things)


No Reservations (soups and salads)


Today's Special (fish, chicken, beef, and pork)


Forks Over Knives (veggie-heavy dishes and sides)


Udon (pasta and noodles)


Just Desserts (sweet treats)


Bottle Shock (beverages)


I'd love to hear about some of your favorite Movie-Inspired recipes! Feel free to leave links and/or recipes in the comments. Also, please join us for our live twitter chat tonight at 7pm (Eastern) using the#SundaySupper hashtag, and check out the Sunday Supper board on Pinterest.

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Coming to Orlando July 19-21, the first annual Food and Wine Conference sponsored by #SundaySupper. Visit the website to learn more and join in on the fun.



 

Pin It

52 comments:

  1. My absolute, all time favorite movie! I watch it at least every couple of months. And .. your sechuan noodles could grace any Chinese dining table. They're just perfect. But then again.. anything with spice... and pork... and well, noodles is a winner in my book! Well done!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm with you, Toby! This dish hits all the necessary buttons for me. I hadn't seen the movie before this Sunday Supper theme came up but it's my new favorite. How have I missed it all these years?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'm so jealous of your wok! These noodles look absolutely wonderful, Stacy!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I've had it for almost 26 years, Jennie, but I must confess, it hardly ever comes out any more. I have a great big non-stick skillet I use instead but, for this event, after watching that wonderful movie, I just had to use it. I was reminded of how much I love it so it's not so far back in the cupboard now. :) Perhaps it'll get to come out more often in future.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It is mesmerizing, isn't it, Renee? I was so impressed and was actually rather relieved to hear that it took two weeks to film. I didn't feel near as inadequate as I had while watching it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. No I have certainly not seen this movie before. Glad to have discovered it through you! I have to admit too that I don't know many food movies out there.

    So that is why they don't cut their noodles? haha never thought of it before but the long live makes sense. ^^
    Thank you very much for sharing your recipe with step by step pics. That should help me getting it completely right. ;) Happy Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
  7. What a yummy dish. I am regretful that I gave my wok to Salvation Army.

    ReplyDelete
  8. number one: I adore this movie (and the sort-of-spinoff, Tortilla Soup)! I get so hungry when I watch it. And number two: I would kill for a bowl of your noodles right now - they look amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a great dish - I don't know why but the image of the nests of noodles in the water really made me smile.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ihave never seen Eat Drink Man Woman, but it sounds like a great movie. I'll have to check it out. These noodles also look and sound great. Like homemade Chinese take out!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh my...one of my faves! I love this dish too. Spicy noodles? I wouldn't even share!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Happy Sunday to you too, Helene! Let me know if you give it a try. It's really quite delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I heard about that one, Heather, but since it was a remake, I decided I should see the original first. Tortilla Soup is on my list though! If you like spicy, you will love these noodles. We loved them!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love those little noodles nests too, Amanda!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Homemade is almost always better than take out, Laura! You need to see this movie. It really was great.

    ReplyDelete
  16. My husband traveled after one big bowlful, Jen, so I have eaten most of this single-handedly over the last couple of days. I have no regrets. :)

    ReplyDelete
  17. This looks amazing... I need to find those Cantonese Egg Noodles so that I can try it.

    ReplyDelete
  18. A lot of normal supermarkets seem to carry them now, Isabel, in the international or Asian aisle or sometimes even with the regular pasta. In actual Asian markets sometimes you can even find the fresh ones!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I could eat the whole platter. This look so amazing! Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  20. I´m literally craving those noodles Stacy! It´s the type of asian recipe that I like, with a lot of ingredients but not complicated. Gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Oh wow, another home run by you!! Great post!!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Oh, how I'd love a big bowl of your spicy noodles! They look fantastic!!!

    ReplyDelete
  23. This looks incredible! I love the flavors going on here. I have to give this a try!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Loved "Eat Drink Man Woman", and your recipe looks amazing. I also love how well worn your wok is. Puts a smile on my face!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Spicy noodles are awesome! Great looking bowl

    ReplyDelete
  26. The noodles look sooo good, Stacy. I can almost hear the sizzle of the soy and spices coating the noodles. Yum!
    P.s. Glad you mentioned the importance of keeping the noodles in their natural "long life" state.

    ReplyDelete
  27. The list was long, Paula, which I know puts some people off, but it really was easy. And so worth it! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thank you, Liz! They were pretty delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Please do, Megan. I hope you like them as much as we did!

    ReplyDelete
  30. I really should use it more, Martin. Thank you for your kind words!

    ReplyDelete
  31. They were awesome, Sarah! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  32. It makes them harder to stir (or toss) but I just can't cut them after so many years in Asia, Kim. Funny how those things get ingrained, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  33. Must tell my sister-in-law about why you shouldn't cut noodles. We always give her a hard time about how she mutilates her spaghetti. This is my kind of dish and sounds like my kind of movie too.

    ReplyDelete
  34. OH my this looks wonderful! I love spicy dishes!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Excuse me as I drool all over my keyboard for a moment!!! I love anything spicy, and this dish has some amazing flavors!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I'm not sure the rule applies to those who aren't Chinese, but I try not to take chances, Shelby!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Drool away, Katie! It's your own keyboard, after all. :) I think this dish will start making a regular rotation at our house. It was that good.

    ReplyDelete
  38. This movie is on my "to watch" list... I've heard such good things and this dish... oh this dish!! BEAUTIFUL Stacy!

    ReplyDelete
  39. MMmmm, this looks SO good! I'm going to have to give this one a try - and I'm also going to have to watch that movie. I've never seen it :)

    ReplyDelete
  40. One of my favorite movies! And this noodle dish sounds awesome. Definitely going to try this. BTW...love your wok! It looks like it's well loved. I wish we had a gas stove so I could use the real deal. I have a nonstick imposter wanna-be wok...but it works for me!

    ReplyDelete
  41. I just love all the helpful pictures in your posts. I've never seen the movie you referenced, but now it's in my Netflix queue. I really appreciated seeing the entire preparation of your noodles, etc. in pictures (we even have the same wok). Great post and beautiful photos!

    ReplyDelete
  42. Thank you, Nicole! I found it on 1channel.ch since I don't have access to Netflix or the like overseas. So glad I did!

    ReplyDelete
  43. It has English subtitles, Conni, so it's not a good multitasking kind of movie, but I settled in with a glass of wine and some olives and really enjoyed it. You just want to jump up and head into the kitchen while they are cooking.

    ReplyDelete
  44. As I mentioned to a couple of the other commenters, Amy, I don't use it often enough because I have an enormous non-stick pan that usually suffices. But for this dish, I just had to break it out again. It is well-loved! I just have to make sure to oil it each time, or it wants to rust. As for the noodles, I hope you enjoy them as much as we did!

    ReplyDelete
  45. Thank you, Alaiyo! Your kind words just made my day!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Good Morning Stacy! The picture looked so spicy and yummy - that I'm here early in the morning reading about your Spicy Sichuan Noodles - loving it and craving for it now. But unfortunately, the post comes much after the #SundaySupper is over!

    ReplyDelete
  47. The #SundaySupper is never really over, Ishita! There is always next Sunday to try it. That said, this is quick enough for a week night meal as well. I need to get better about posting on our FooderatiArabia site. This was my first post in AGES.


    And P.S. I ate them for breakfast the next day. They were even more delicious in the morning. :)

    ReplyDelete
  48. I bet it tasted even better, with the spices becoming more strong!

    ReplyDelete
  49. It did! I don't know if they became more strong but they had soaked into the noodles even more, if that's possible.

    ReplyDelete

Where in the world are you? Leave me a comment! It makes me happy to know you are out there.