Showing posts with label #SundaySupper. Show all posts
Showing posts with label #SundaySupper. Show all posts

Sunday, July 17, 2016

Fresh Peach Cucumber Salad #SundaySupper

Fresh peaches that aren’t fully ripe can still be used in a fresh peach cucumber salad, adding a tart bite with a hint of sweet. An herby dressing with mint and parsley complement the peaches beautifully.

This week my Sunday Supper group are using peaches in a variety of recipes both sweet and savory. I’m in the Channel Islands right now where apparently they make no bones about the fact that the peaches are picked too young. The little plastic boxes they are sold in say quite boldly – Ripen At Home. But I think we all know how that turns out. They really don’t taste the same or ripen well at home. Never mind, though, because slightly under ripe peaches are still tasty in salad. If you are fortunate enough to have good peaches, those work too!

Ingredients
For the dressing:
1/4 cup or 60ml extra virgin olive oil
1/8 cup or 30ml good quality white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon whole grain mustard
3 tablespoons finely minced fresh mint
1 tablespoon finely minced parsley
1/4 teaspoon sugar
For the salad:
1 English cucumber
4 peaches
1/4 medium purple onion
2 1/2 oz or 70g pea sprouts

Method
Put all the dressing ingredients in a jar. Close the lid tightly and give it a good shake to combine the ingredients. Set it aside at room temperature while you get on with prepping the salad.

Cut your cucumber lengthwise in half, then cut the halves again so you have four long pieces. If the seeds are too juicy, you can but them off and discard. (My dog loves them!) Chop the cucumber into smaller chunks.

Cut the peach off the pit in slices, then cut those into smaller pieces. If you have freestone peaches, you can remove the pit, then slice and cut.

Finely slice your onion.



Add the cucumber, peaches and onion to a large salad bowl.  Give the herb dressing another good shake and drizzle on just as much as you need to wet the peaches and cucumbers. You might not use it all. (It’ll keep well in the refrigerator for a week or two.)



Toss to coat.

Add in the pea sprouts just as you are ready to serve and toss again.



Enjoy!



Many thanks to our Peachy Keen host, Sue of Palatable Pastime and our event manager, Renee of Renee’s Kitchen Adventures. Take a look at all the deliciousness we have for you this week!


Starters:
Breakfasts:
Beverages:
Condiments:
Sides & Salads:
Main Dishes:
Desserts
Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter every Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.

To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement

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Sunday, July 10, 2016

Lime Coconut Lassi #SundaySupper

Made with yogurt, coconut milk and fresh lime juice sweetened with a little honey, this coconut lime lassi is the perfect drink on a hot summer day. 




My mom has a go-to place in Houston when she is out running errands. It’s called Rajah’s and her standard order is two samosas and a sweet lassi. Somehow the cool yogurt drink goes perfectly with the spicy fried samosas filled with curried potatoes and peas. And the two together make the perfect snack.

This week my Sunday Supper group is cooking and creating with coconut so I made a delightful chickpea potato curry for the Sunday Supper website. So Tasty! For this space, what could be more perfect than a complementary lassi? The sharp lime juice and yogurt were deliciously mellowed by the creamy coconut and the honey added just the right amount of sweetness. This drink would also make a delicious cocktail with the simple addition of a little rum.

Ingredients - for about 12 oz or 355ml. One tall glass or two shorter glasses, if you feel like sharing.
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons honey
1 cup or 240ml coconut milk
1/3 cup or 85g plain Greek (thick) yoghurt
6-8 ice cubes

Method
Add the lime juice and honey to a large clean jar. Swirl around or stir until the honey dissolves in the lime juice.



Add in the coconut milk, yogurt and ice.


Put the lid on the jar and shake until well combined and frothy. Pour into glass or glasses.


Garnish with slices of lime.



Enjoy!

Are you craving coconut? This is your Sunday! Many thanks to our host Conni of Cosmopolitan Cornbread and our event manager Shelby of Grumpy’s Honeybunch for all of their hard work this week.

Great Starts
Dive in with Sides and Appetizers
Coco-Nutty Main Dishes
"Col-lots-a" Desserts
Sweet to Sip Beverages
Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.

To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.
Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

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Sunday, July 3, 2016

Pumped Up Potato Salad #SundaySupper

Pumped up potato salad combines new potatoes with charred red peppers, tomatoes, olives, feta and basil for a wonderful summer salad. 

I love new potatoes. In fact, if I can make a confession, we ate them for dinner last night and they are on the menu again tonight. You see, it’s the season. One can find little potatoes at other times of the year but what separates a new potato from a simply small potato is the thin skin that can be eaten. In some varieties, like the Jersey Royal, it’s so thin that it can be rubbed off with bare hands. In any case, with new potatoes, no peeling is necessary.

Here's another confession. I wanted to name these Pimp My Potato Salad but my younger daughter wouldn't let me.

This week my Sunday Supper group is sharing easy recipes for the Fourth of July. While my grandmother’s more labor-intensive mayo-based potato salad is far and away my favorite, this pumped up potato salad is a close second. It’s easy to make and travels well – no big worries about refrigeration - which makes it the perfect for bringing to an Independence Day picnic or barbecue.

Ingredients
1 1/2 - 2 teaspoons salt
1 lb or 450g new potatoes
3 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 small onion
1 garlic clove
14 oz or 400g grape tomatoes, assorted colors
1 red pepper
1/2 cup or 70g pitted, sliced black olives
3 1/2 oz or 100g feta cheese
Black pepper
handful basil leaves

Method
Put the potatoes to cook in a pot of boiling water with about 1 1/2 teaspoon salt added in, until fork tender.

Meanwhile thinly slice your onion and crush/mince your garlic. Add them to a large bowl with the white balsamic vinegar. Sprinkle on some salt and give the content a good stir. Set aside to marinate.



Skewer your red pepper with a fork and hold it over the flame of your gas stove, turning slowing until the pepper is charred on all side.

If you don’t have gas, you can also roast the pepper in a very hot oven. Pop charred pepper in a sturdy plastic bag when it’s done and twist the top closed.

When the potatoes are cooked, drain them well and set aside to cool for about five minutes.

Mix the olive oil in with the other dressing ingredients.

Remove the red pepper from the bag and use your clean hands to rub off the charred skin. Cut off and discard the interior membranes and seeds. Slice the red pepper into strips.



When the potatoes are still warm but not hot, add them to the bowl and toss to make sure that they are covered with the onion garlic dressing. If there are a few that are bigger than bite-sized, you can cut these in half.





Add the pepper strips, tomatoes and olives to the salad bowl. Toss well.



Crumble in the feta and sprinkle on some more salt, to taste and a few good grinds of fresh black pepper.

Tear the basil leaves with your hands and toss them with the rest of the salad.

Enjoy!






Many thanks to Cindy from Cindy's Recipes and Writings who is hosting this week and Shelby from Grumpy's Honeybunch, our event manager. Your hard work is greatly appreciated, ladies!

Are you looking for some easy recipes to bring to a Fourth of July celebration? Sunday Supper has got you covered! Check out all great recipes below – so many that are red, white and blue as well!

All-American Appetizers
America the Beautiful Beverages
Raise the Flag Breakfasts
For the Red, White and Blue Salads and Main Dishes
Oh Say Can You See Desserts
Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter every Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.
To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board. Get all the latest from Sunday Supper by signing up here for our weekly newsletter.
 Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.


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Sunday, June 26, 2016

Waffled Falafel Sandwiches #SundaySupper

To get your homemade falafels crispy outside and fluffy inside without frying, the trick is to cook them in a lightly oiled waffle iron, creating waffled falafels. They are great as is, or stuffed in flatbread, drizzled with tahini sauce. 

We were living in Sydney almost 30 years ago when my husband came home from work one day with the news that he had been offered a transfer to Abu Dhabi. What did I think? We had been in Australia for a number of months on a temporary project, and I had resigned from my dream job to follow along. The friendly yet unaccommodating folks at Australian immigration had stamped my passport Employment Prohibited and, because of strict quarantine laws, we had left our furry son in the care of friends. My first question was, can I work there? The second was, can we import the dog? When the answers were yes and yes, we looked the United Arab Emirates up on the map and made our decision.

Abu Dhabi in the 1980s was a special place, a city that felt like a small town. The only fast food joints were Kentucky Fried Chicken – where the only choice was original recipe – and the small, family run shawarma and falafel places. After a busy day at the office, we’d stop by and order shawarma sandwiches to go. The falafel guy sat on the sidewalk just outside the little café, his enormous pot of boiling hot oil heated by a gas burner, much like the ones we use in the US to heat water for boiling crawfish and crabs. As we waited for our wrapped sandwiches, he’d hand us each a freshly fried falafel in a bit of paper, compliments of the house. They reminded me of southern hush puppies. Crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside. In a word, just perfect.

When we left the Middle East for Southeast Asia a couple of years later, I pined for the falafel guy. Eventually I got over him, but I’ve never forgotten how a real, freshly cooked falafel should taste.

Sure, you can buy falafel mixes at the grocery store, but homemade falafels are super easy and so much more tasty. You control the salt and spices and all the ingredients are wholesome and good for you. The only downside of falafels, healthy-wise, it that they are fried. I know, I know, some people say you can bake them, but I’ll be honest, if I’ve managed to get them crunchy on the outside, the inside is often dried out.



Waffle iron to the rescue!

Homemade falafels are as quick to put together as the mixes but just require a little advance planning since the chickpeas need to be soaked first overnight. Some cookbook writers will tell you that you can use canned chickpeas – I’m looking at you, Nigel Slater. And don’t even get me started on Jamie Oliver who serves his canned bean falafels in wholewheat tortillas. – but don’t listen to them. Using raw soaked chickpeas is not only more authentic but the traditional recipe is the best because the resulting falafels taste right and have the right texture. Trust me.

Ingredients
For the falafels:
1 1/2 cups or 285g dried chickpeas, soaked overnight in cool water
1 small onion, (about 100g roughly chopped
1/4 cup, packed, or 13g chopped fresh parsley
1/4 cup, packed, or 13g chopped cilantro
3 cloves garlic
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1 egg

1 tablespoon vegetable oil for your waffle iron – oils with a high flash point are best. I use peanut oil.

For the tahini sauce:
1/2 cup tahini sesame seed paste
1/3 cup lukewarm water, or more for consistency
1 cloves raw garlic
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (or more to taste)
Good pinch salt (or more to taste)

To assemble the sandwiches:
Arabic or Lebanese flatbread or pita
Tahini sauce
Sliced tomatoes
Sliced onions
Sliced cucumbers

Method
Cover your dried chickpeas with ample cool water and leave them to soak overnight or even as much as 24 hours. Drain your chickpeas.

Put the chickpeas in a food processor and pulse a few times until the chickpeas look like big crumbles. It should still be very loose and dry. Add in the onions and herbs and seasoning and pulse until quite fine. Use a spatula to scrape down the sides a couple of times.



Add in the egg and pulse until you have a fairly smooth paste where little bitty bits of chickpea are still visible. Scrape down the sides of the processor as you do.



Transfer the paste into a clean bowl and cover well with cling film. Refrigerate for half an hour.



Preheat your Belgian waffle iron. That’s the kind with the deep squares that makes thick waffles.

Use a spoon to scoop our about on one tenth of your paste. It should fit comfortably in the palm of your hand. Form it into a patty of even thickness.



Lightly oil the waffle iron with using a pasty brush and place the patty in it.  Make more patties and add them to the waffle iron as well.

Some Belgian waffle irons have four squares. Some, like mine, have only two. Close the lid and let gravity determine how it falls. Do not push down on the lid.





Cook until the light on your waffle iron says "ready" then leave them in for about another minute or so to ensure that the outsides are lovely and crispy.

Keep the waffled falafels warm in a slow oven until all are cooked and you are ready to serve.



To make the tahini sauce

Crush the garlic clove with a garlic press or with the side of a knife. Add it to a small bowl with the lemon juice and good pinch of salt. Whisk in the tahini paste then add the water, whisking well until you achieve the consistency you want.



Slice up your tomato, cucumber and onion.

To assemble the sandwiches, put a few slices of tomato and cucumber on the flatbread. Top with the falafel, drizzle on the tahini sauce and sprinkle with the sliced onions.



Enjoy!

I love creative waffles, don't you?

Here are a few I've loved and make sure to scroll down to see a great list of others from my Sunday Supper group.


Cheesy Ham Waffles made with smoky ham and lots of cheese in a buttermilk waffle batter. 



Cauliflower Cheese Waffles with steamed cauliflower, loads of cheese and a little English mustard.



Loaded Baked Potato Waffles with potatoes, cheddar, green onion, sour cream and, of course, bacon!


Guess what? June 29th is National Waffle Iron Day! Who knew, right? My Sunday Supper group is celebrating by bringing you a plethora of wondeful waffle recipes, both sweet and savory. Many thanks to Sue of Palatable Pastime, our host for this tasty event, as well as Renee of Renee’s Kitchen Adventures, our campaign manager.

Sweet and Sinful Waffles

Savory Brinner Winners:

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter on Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement. To keep up with all the news at Sunday Supper, sign up for our weekly newsletter, delivered right to your inbox.

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Sunday, June 19, 2016

Natural Pink Pineapple Lemonade #SundaySupper

For Sunday Suppers or special occasions like when we’d visit, my grandmother always added crushed pineapple to pink lemonade. It was especially welcome in the hot summertime. 

My grandmother and grandfather worked hard every day. Running their own store and appliance repair service made it a challenge to take time off. In fact, I don’t recall that they ever took a vacation except to visit us once when we lived overseas. Looking back, I have no idea who they would have left in charge. They did love it when we’d come to visit though and the refrigerator was always stocked with our favorites from ice cream sandwiches to cookies to hot dogs.

Back in the olden days, we could take a train from Houston that would stop off in New Iberia, on its way to New Orleans and other points east. I remember going to spend a week or two with my grandparents, often taking a friend with me. We’d either ride the train there and Mom would come for a visit as well and pick us up, or she’d bring us and we’d take the train back home again. What was a four- or five-hour car ride took a couple of extra hours on the train. But we didn’t care! We were on our own with a packed lunch, books to read and snacks – no adult supervision! – and riding the train was an adventure. I just checked out the Amtrak schedules and that route is still do-able and reasonably priced, but children under 12 must have an adult traveling with them now. More's the pity.

We’d arrive parched from the heat, the clackety clack of the rails still echoing in our ears, and Mo would mix up a big pitcher of pink lemonade, made from a canister of instant lemonade powder – you probably know the one – and add a can of crushed pineapple and ice. Talk about refreshing! Pink lemonade with pineapple was one of her favorite drinks to serve at lunch on Sundays as well, or other special occasions.

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I’ve figured out that if I make regular fresh lemonade and add some cranberry or pomegranate juice, I can get the pretty effect of pink lemonade without the pink food dye. It’s not as pink as my grandmother’s concoction, unless you add a bunch of red juice but it’s probably better for you.

Ingredients for one 2 quart or 1.89 liter pitcher
1/2 cup or 100g sugar
1 (15 oz or 425g) crushed pineapple in light syrup
1 1/2 cups or 355ml freshly squeezed lemon juice
3/4 cup or 177ml (or more to color to your liking) cranberry or pomegranate juice
Cold water
Ice

Note: If you can only find the crushed pineapple in heavy syrup, you might be able to skip making the simple syrup. The pineapple syrup should sweeten the lemonade enough without additional sugar.

Method
Make simple syrup by dissolving the sugar in 1/2 cup or 120ml of hot water. Set aside to cool.

In your large pitcher, combine the crushed pineapple with its syrup and lemon juice. Add some ice and water to almost fill your pitcher. Remember that you need room for the cranberry or pomegranate juice and some simple syrup. Stir well.

Add the red juice and taste the lemonade.


Add enough of the simple syrup till it’s sweet enough for your liking. (See note above if using crushed pineapple in heavy syrup.)

Stir well before you pour each time to get the pineapple moving. Serve over ice.


Enjoy!

As a bonus, if you happen to have a small hand crank ice shaver like those ones they sell at Pampered Chef, this pineappley pink lemonade freezes great and makes wonderfully refreshing shaved ice. You can use it for popsicles as well, but the pineapple ends up near the top of the popsicle.



Nostalgic summer recipes are our theme for this week’s Sunday Supper. Many thanks to Coleen from The Redhead Baker for hosting! What’s your favorite summertime food memory?

Summertime Recipes

Beverages
Breakfast
Appetizers
Main Dishes
Side Dishes
Desserts
Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter every Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.

To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board. Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.



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Sunday, June 12, 2016

Personal Banana Cream Pie #SundaySupper

A personal banana cream pie is the perfect way to tell Dad how much you love him. All the delicious sweetness of a full size pie that he doesn’t have to share.

It’s a tradition in our house that my husband gets a banana cream pie at least twice a year, for his birthday in March and Father’s Day in June. For years I made it. When they got old enough, our girls took over, at least on Father’s Day. Now they both live away from home and it’s back to me again. Making banana cream pie is something I do willingly because the joy on his face is worth the time and effort. This year, with only two of us at home, and one who doesn’t really eat sweet things much (me), I decided it made more sense to make a personal banana cream pie. Cut in half, it’s two very generous pieces and you can guess who enjoyed both of them!

When a whole 10-inch pie is just too much pie, downsize! Are you cooking for an empty nest too? You might find my tips on cooking for an empty nest helpful. Conversely, if you want to make a full size banana cream pie, <click there.

Ingredients 
For the custard:
1/3 cup or 66g sugar
1/4 cup or 31g flour
Good pinch salt
1 2/3 cups or 395ml milk
3 egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

For a 7-in pie crust:
1 cup or 125g all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling out
1⁄4 cup or 57g shortening
1/4 teaspoon salt
2-3 tablespoons cold water

To assemble the pie and serve:
2 medium bananas, ripe but not soft
3/4 cup or 180ml heavy whipping cream

Method
To make the custard:
In a large saucepan (no heat!) mix sugar, flour and salt.  Stir in milk until smooth.



Over medium heat, cook mixture, stirring constantly, until mixture is thickened and begins to boil (about 10 minutes). Boil one minute. Remove immediately from heat and set aside.

Separate your egg yolks from your whites, putting the whites directly into a sealable plastic container for the refrigerator. (You can make meringues or almond macaroons with these later.) Put the yolks in a bowl with enough room to whisk.

Beat egg yolks quickly with a whisk, while drizzling in about a 1/8 cup of the hot milk mixture. Quick beating and slow drizzling are essential so that you don’t end up with cooked eggs.

Slowly pour egg mixture into the saucepan, stirring rapidly to prevent lumping. I stopped whisking briefly to take the photo. You just keep whisking!



Over low heat, cook, stirring constantly, until very thick (do not boil) and mixture mounds when dropped from spoon.



Remove from heat; stir in butter and vanilla.  Congratulations, you have made homemade vanilla custard.  Once the butter has melted and you've mixed it and the vanilla completely in, pour the custard into a metal bowl. Cover its surface with plastic wrap to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until chilled and set, about two hours.



While the custard is chilling, we'll make the pie crust. Preheat your oven to 425°F or 218°C.

In medium bowl using a fork, lightly stir together the flour and salt.

With a pastry blender, cut in the shortening until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs.



Sprinkle in the cold water, a tablespoon at a time, mixing lightly with a fork after each addition until pastry just holds together.



Use your hands to shape the pastry into a ball. Wrap it in cling film and refrigerate 30 minutes.

Lightly flour your clean work surface. With lightly floured rolling pin, roll pastry into circle 1⁄8 inch thick and about 2 inches larger all around than pie plate.

Transfer the circle to your pie plate.

Fold overhang under; then pinch to make a decorative edge. Prick bottom and side of crust all over with a fork, to prevent puffing during baking.


Line the crust with a circle of baking parchment and cover with baking beads or dried beans.

Bake for 15 minutes or until golden. Remove the baking beads. Set aside.



Once your custard is cool, you can peel your bananas. Cut them in half lengthwise. Spread a little of the custard in the bottom of your baked piecrust and then add a layer of bananas.

Spread the rest of the custard all over the bananas, making sure to fill in the gaps so that there is no air around the bananas.  This will prevent them from going brown.

Securely cover the custard with plastic wrap once more and put the pie back in the refrigerator until you are ready to serve.



Just before serving: In small bowl with mixer at medium speed, beat cream until stiff peaks form. Heap cream on pie. One of my husband's policies is that there is no such thing as too much cream.


Enjoy!

Keep up with all the latest news at Sunday Supper
by signing up for our weekly newsletter.

Check out this great list of recipes from my Sunday Supper family! Everybody is sharing their dads' favorites today. Many thanks to our host this week, Sarah from The Chef Next Door.

Appetizers, Snacks and Beverages
Breakfast
Condiments & Sauces
Side Dishes
Main Dishes
Desserts
Are you stumped for a Father's Day gift? Find out What Dad Really Wants for Father’s Day from Sunday Supper Movement

Sunday Supper MovementJoin the #SundaySupper conversation on Twitter every Sunday! We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7 p.m. ET. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat.

To get more great Sunday Supper Recipes, visit our website or check out our Pinterest board.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here: Sunday Supper Movement.

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