Sunday, September 29, 2013

Honeycomb Crunch Candy for #SundaySupper


When the theme for this week’s Sunday Supper was announced as Crunchy Goodness, I was in the midst of trying to decide on a flavor for my upcoming BundtaMonth cake where the theme is candy.  I was browsing the candy aisle of one of my local grocery store chains, the British import, Waitrose and nothing jumped out at me.  If you’ve been reading along for a while, or if you know me personally, you know that I don’t have much of a sweet tooth.  There are a couple of exceptions to this rule and they include all things caramel, especially if there is salt involved.  And suddenly, the solution came to me!  I could combine these two challenges by making crunchy honeycomb candy and then using it in a honey Bundt cake.  Win-win, right?  And to celebrate my personal triumph of ideas, I headed over to Tavola and bought myself a new Bundt pan.  Hey, any excuse for a new Bundt pan!  (Come back on 4 October when the cake will be unveiled!)

I researched my cookbooks using Eat Your Books and trawled through deep internet waters, looking for the perfect honeycomb recipe.   I finally settled on this one from Joy the Baker
but since it didn’t have honey, I substituted that for the corn syrup and changed the apple cider vinegar to white balsamic.  I decided to double the recipe – unnecessarily, as it turned out – to make sure we’d have enough to munch on and still have plenty for the cake.  One batch would have been sufficient.  But, working on the theory that one can never have too much honeycomb crunch candy, I have no regrets.  Store anything that is not consumed immediately in the freezer or refrigerator, well-sealed, with the layers of candy separated by parchment paper or waxed paper.  Unless you live somewhere cold and dry, it gets sticky very quickly at room temperature.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon baking soda or bicarbonate of soda
2 2/3 cups or 600g sugar
1 cup or 240ml runny honey
3/4 cup or 180ml water
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar
Butter for preparing the pan

Necessary equipment – candy thermometer and large, deep pot with heavy bottom, aluminum foil

Method
Sift your baking soda into a small bowl and set aside close to the stove.

Prepare a large baking pan by lining it with aluminum foil and buttering the foil liberally.  Set aside near the baking soda bowl.  If you can’t put a hot pot on your counter top, add a trivet or hot pad nearby (for the candy pot) and another underneath the baking pan.


Mix your sugar, honey, water, cream of tartar and balsamic vinegar in your deep, thick-bottomed pot.  Set it on the stove over a medium flame and whisk until all the sugar is dissolved.


Put the candy thermometer in and make sure the tip is in the liquid.  Gently swirl the pot every so often as it heats.  At one point, mine bubbled up a bit so I stirred with the whisk to settle it down.


You are looking for the thermometer to hit 300°F or 149°C.   When it reaches the correct temperature, remove the pot from the stove and set it on the counter or on the trivet or hot pad you have ready.

Remove the thermometer and pour in the baking soda and whisk quickly.  This will expand like crazy and suddenly the need for a deep pot becomes violently apparent.


 
Carefully pour the molten bubbles into your buttered, foil-lined baking pan and leave it to cool and harden.


After mine had cooled somewhat, I transferred it to the deep freezer to speed up the process but that’s just because I am impatient.

When it’s completely cooled and hardened, lift the foil out of the pan and turn the slab of candy over onto a cutting board.  Peel back the foil and gently break the honeycomb crunch with a small hammer you have borrowed from your daughter’s toolbox.  Just kidding.  Any hammer will do.



As previously mentioned, this turns soft and sticky when exposed to air so line a plastic container with parchment or waxed paper and store the candy in the refrigerator or freezer.  Many recipes also suggested that dipping the candy in melted chocolate would keep the moisture out as well.   If you try that, let me know how it goes.

Save the little crunchy shards too!  They will be great to sprinkle on a honey cake! 

Enjoy!












Do you love crunchy things?  Then this week’s Sunday Supper round up, hosted by Susan of The Girl in the Little Red Kitchen, will be your favorite week.   I know it’s one of mine.

                                                Sunday Supper Movement

Crispy Appetizers:
Crunchy Entrees and Sides:
Munch on Snacks:
Crisp Desserts:

Join the #SundaySupper conversation on twitter each Sunday. We tweet throughout the day and share recipes from all over the world. Our weekly chat starts at 7:00 pm ET and you do not want to miss out on the fun. Follow the #SundaySupper hashtag and remember to include it in your tweets to join in the chat. Check out our #SundaySupper Pinterest board for more fabulous recipes and food photos.

Would you like to join the Sunday Supper Movement? It’s easy. You can sign up by clicking here → Sunday Supper Movement




Pin It

56 comments:

  1. You are sooo smart, Stacy! Your honeycomb candy looks truly professional. And I'm sure your honey Bundt is going to be beautiful, too!


    P.s. Tee hee hee-ing about our similar fondness for purchasing Bundt pans =)

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a caramel making fear, not joking! I experienced too many disasters and I always end up with a few burns and pains. I think I need a candy thermometer but I don't think so we can get that here... I ll get somebody to bring me one from EU. =D
    In the mean while... would you mind sending me a batch of those? =D

    ReplyDelete
  3. So funny, my Husband wanted me to make these, but my candy thermometer doesn't work! Awesome recipe!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am totally drooling over here... Delish!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I know what you mean, Helene. Caramel gets so hot and burns so easily but this was comparatively simple. I bought my thermometer in the US but I imagine they have them here in Dubai if you'd like me to look and post you one.

    ReplyDelete
  6. It was easy, Kim! And any excuse to buy a new Bundt pan, right?! I bought the same one as the Traveling Swirly Pan which I had been coveting for months.

    ReplyDelete
  7. You need a new one, Jennifer! Fortunately they aren't that expensive. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I made this for our #SS culinary bucket list week :). I tested out a couple of recipes until I found (what I thought was) the perfect one (http://www.girlichef.com/2013/01/HomemadeSeafoamCandy.html) ...and now of course I'm craving it again. Looks fantastic, Stacy! :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. I had forgotten that you made this, Heather! I looked back at my comment and I said I loved your growing up story and I ate the same candy as a child but we called it honeycomb. :) Yours looks wonderful but I was determined to create a recipe that actually used honey so it would go with my honey cake. That said, probably any seafoam or honeycomb really would though.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I thought the "honeycomb" was just named for the look, never thought about honey in the actual recipe! I'd like to try it with honey one day, actually. :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. You are absolutely right, but a few recipes I came across called for some honey so I thought, why not all honey instead of the corn syrup? It was worth a try and worked beautifully, much to my delight.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have always wanted to make honeycomb. This looks fabulous! The cake with it sounds very yummy too.

    ReplyDelete
  13. There you go adding another to-do to my list. I'm putting it on my holiday candy list. I'll just have to store it in the fridge until I give it as gifts. The humidity here in Georgia is ridiculous. The candy would get sticky in a flash.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Your honey comb candy looks melt in your mouth delicious!!!

    ReplyDelete
  15. This is on my bucket list! Anything that requires use of a hammer is a must-make ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  16. Any recipe that allows me to use a hammer is one that I want to try!


    I love honeycomb candies and this is now on my 'must make' list! Thanks for a fun post and delicious recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  17. HOW COOL! I cannot believe you made your own honeycomb crunch candies, so pretty!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hahaha... I love that your daughter has a tool box. I feel like such a let-down to the women's movement, I hate doing anything remotely in the 'home maintenance' category. I do the cleaning and leave my husband to use the hammer and drill. I think he's quite happy with the exchange ;) Anyway, back to this gorgeous recipe. Love the look of these candies! I've never made honeycomb but I've always wanted to. Yours looks perfectly crunchy and delicious (dipped in chocolate? That's got my name on it!). I can see that you've used that beautiful material from your daughter as a backdrop again. Love it xx

    ReplyDelete
  19. I was just thinking recently I'd like to give honeycomb a crack (oooh no pun intended, but boomtish!) It looks damn good :-)

    ReplyDelete
  20. From the time she was about five years old, she had a tiny toolbox full of real tools, Laura. Screwdrivers, measuring tape, hammer, etc. but her favorite things were her little c-clamps. I used to find them attached to various places about the house that "needed fixing." Over the years, her tools got mixed up with her daddy's and I am not sure what happened to her little box. But it makes me happy to use her hammer, which is a real one, but just smaller, because it reminds me of her helpfulness and of when she was small. Thanks for the kind words about her fabric! I'll pass them on for sure.


    As for the honeycomb, if you do make it and dip it in chocolate, I'd love to hear your results!

    ReplyDelete
  21. Thank you, Kayle! It is so easy, really!

    ReplyDelete
  22. It melts in your mouth and then tries to pull your fillings out, Liz. :)

    ReplyDelete
  23. Thank you, Betsy! I think some folks use an ice pick to break it up, but I liked using the little hammer. :)

    ReplyDelete
  24. Ha, ha, Brydie! It's the perfect pun here. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Oh my goodness, this is my all-time favorite candy. I didn't even THINK about making it myself!! This looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Anybody who can make a cake that looks just like an enormous peanut butter cup can surely make this easy candy, Cathleen! Give it a try!

    ReplyDelete
  27. This packs an awesome crunch, great idea. I love making this in the fall!!

    ReplyDelete
  28. Thanks, Tara. It was fun to make. Science at work!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Yum! I would like to crunch on this all afternoon!

    ReplyDelete
  30. I think I would like this MUCH better than peanut brittle - If I could only get that temp right.........I'll practice!!

    ReplyDelete
  31. Wow - very impressive and delicious looking. Sounds like the perfect treat!

    ReplyDelete
  32. Oh, I love peanut brittle too, Kelli! The temperature is just a matter of a thermometer and patience. :)

    ReplyDelete
  33. It actually doesn't take much force to break it, Nancy. But the candy-eating should help your stress levels. :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. Stacy! this is brilliant and I love that you are using THIS for Bundt-a-month!!! Fabulous and so smart! I love this Honeycomb Crunch Candy and it looks sooooo good!

    ReplyDelete
  35. Honeycomb! My Nan used to make this for us-such great memories.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Very different, I'd try it chocolate dipped!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Ooh, this sounds almost like a crunchy toffee bark my mom used to make. Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Thank you, Alice! It just about pulled my fillings out but, otherwise, it's delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Glad I could bring you some happy memories, Jane.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Some people call it honeycomb toffee, Sarah, so it just might be the same.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Oh very interesting! I'm wondering if I'll like it since I'm picky about eating hard candy. You better send me some samples to make sure.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Honeycomb is the good stuff and it's so pretty too!

    ReplyDelete
  43. I really admire every step and effort that you have put in to make this honey comb candy. Yum!

    ReplyDelete
  44. Wish I could, Carla. It doesn't travel very well, especially in our heat. :(

    ReplyDelete
  45. What's not to love? Caramel = good every time!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Isn't it just, Susan! I was so pleased with myself when I poured it out all bubbly and golden. And then when it's cracked! The little shards just sparkle.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Thank you, Faye! It really is quite easy, as long as you have a candy thermometer.

    ReplyDelete

Where in the world are you? Leave me a comment! It makes me happy to know you are out there.