Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Moo Shu Pancakes #BreadBakers

Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.

Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.


This month my Bread Bakers are celebrating pancakes of all sorts at the instigation of our host, Wendy from A Day in the Life on the Farm. Today is Mardi Gras – or Fat Tuesday – also known in many places around the world as Pancake Day.

In the United Kingdom, this refers to what we Americans know as crepes, a thin pancake made with batter. And, of course, most of my readers will be familiar with fluffy American pancakes, served with butter and maple syrup. But Wendy encouraged us to scour the world for pancake recipes so I chose to make moo shu pancakes, a favorite in Chinese cuisine.

When we lived in Kuala Lumpur many years ago, I used to make these to wrap store-bought roasted duck or char sui pork. They are so much better than the pancakes you can buy in the store. But if you follow me on Instagram, you might have noticed a couple of hanging ducks in my feed in the last few months. We finally made Peking ducks ourselves, first as a trial run and then as the main course of our Christmas dinner. I even made my own plum sauce.

Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.


I’ll put a few photos in the instructions to help you with the method of making moo shu pancakes, but I highly encourage you to check out Ken Hom’s how-to video on YouTube as well. He is a master.

And if you are already a Ken Hom fan, you might want to try my version of his spicy Sichuan noodles. For even more pancakes, including my crunchy spring onion version, check out this post and make sure to scroll down to see what my Bread Bakers are sharing today.

Moo Shu Pancakes

Easy to make and even easier to eat, moo shu pancakes are great with all sorts of fillings.

Ingredients for 16-18 pancakes
2 cups or 250g  all-purpose flour, plus extra for kneading and rolling 
3/4 - 1 cup or 180-240ml very hot water     
2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil   

Method
Measure your flour into a large bowl and make a well in the middle. Pour in 3/4 cup or 180ml of the hot water and stir the flour into the water until it is completely incorporated. If it is too dry, add a little more water.



Tip the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it for about 8 minutes, sprinkling with a little more flour as necessary. When you have a nice stretchy ball, put it back in the bowl and cover the bowl with a clean, damp cloth. Leave the dough to rest for about half an hour, or pop it in the refrigerator till you are ready to cook the pancakes.





After the resting time, roll the dough out into a long tube, about 1 inch or 2.5cm in diameter. Cut it with a sharp knife into about 16-18 equal pieces. You need an even number. Roll the pieces into balls and set aside.



Sprinkle your working surface with a little flour and put your sesame oil in a small bowl. Press one ball down to flatten it slightly. Dip another ball into the sesame oil and place it on top of the first ball.  Press down again to flatten the top ball.





Use a floured rolling pin to roll the two balls into circles about 6 in or 15cm wide. Repeat the process until you have rolled all of the twin sets of balls into circles.



Heat a dry griddle pan or non-stick skillet over a medium heat and cook the moo shu pancakes one or two at a time, depending on the size of your pan. This takes just a few minutes on each side and a few brown spots are desirable.

Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.

As each pancake is done, remove it from the pan and allow to rest briefly, until it’s cool enough to handle. Carefully peel the two pancakes apart and put them in a warm place, covered with a slightly damp cloth. This will keep them from drying out as you cook the rest.

Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.

These can be served with Peking duck, char sui pork, pan-fried duck breasts or frankly, anywhere you’d also use a flour tortilla. I even ate a couple with golden syrup. Any leftovers, should you be so lucky, can be wrapped tightly in cling film and frozen.

Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.


Many thanks to Wendy from A Day in the Life on the Farm for hosting this month. Make sure you check out all the other lovely pancakes my Bread Bakers are sharing today!


BreadBakers

#BreadBakers is a group of bread loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bread with a common ingredient or theme. Follow our Pinterest board right here. Links are also updated each month on this home page.

We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme/ingredient.


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Food Lust People Love: Moo shu pancakes, aka Chinese pancakes or Peking doilies, are traditionally served rolled up with a filling of crispy Peking duck, cucumbers and spring onions. They are easy to make, with only two ingredients.

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